March 16, 2014

10th English - Second report of Dr.Watson - Light on the Moor

Read the passage given below. Then answer the questions that follow the passage.

Before breakfast on the morning following my adventure, I went and examined the room in which Barrymore had been. I noticed one peculiarity in the window through which Barrymore had stared out. One can get the best view of the moor through this window. There is an opening between two trees. And it is though this window that one can look right down on to it: from the other windows it is just a distant glimpse. So it seems that Barrymore was looking out for someone or something on the moor. The same morning I talked to Sir Henry and told him all I had seen. He was less surprised than I had expected.

1. Who is the narrator?
2. What is the adventure that is referred to?
3. What was special about the window in that particular room?
4. Why did Barrymore visit the room?
5. Why was Sir Henry not surprised when told about the adventure of the night before?

Answers:

1. Dr Watson is the narrator.
2. Dr Watson had followed Barrymore the previous night to find out what he could be doing, walking with a candle at 2 m. This is the adventure Dr Watson refers to.
3. The specialty of that window in that particular room was that it offered the best view of the moor.
4. Barrymore wanted to find out what Barrymore could have been doing in an unfurnished and unoccupied room, at that time of the night.
5. Sir Henry knew that Barrymore walked at that time of the night. So, he wasn’t as surprised as Watson expected.

Read the passage given below. Then answer the questions that follow the passage.

In order to find out the reason behind Barrymore’s night walks, I sat in Sir Henry’s room. Nothing happened on the first night. Determined to solve the mystery, we sat up the next night also. As we were about to give up, we heard his step. We let him pass our door and then followed him.

Barrymore did exactly what he did before. And when we peeped into the room, he was crouched at the window, candle in hand and his face pressed against the window.

1. Who is narrating the incident described here?
2. Who is Barrymore?
3. Who were the people who sat up the next night also?
4. Who is Sir Henry?
5. Why was Barrymore crouched at the window?

Answers:

1. Dr Watson is narrating the incedent described here.
2. Mr Barrymore is son of the old caretaker and the butler of Baskerville Hall.
3. Dr Watson and Sir Henry were the people who sat up the next night also.
4. Sir Henry is the son of Sir Charles’ younger brother, the heir to Baskerville Hall and the last remaining Baskerville.
5. Barrymore was signalling to his brother-in-law Selden, the escaped convict, who was starving on the cold moor, that food was ready.

Read the passage given below. Then answer the questions that follow the passage.

In order to find out the reason behind Barrymore’s night walks, I sat in Sir Henry’s room. Nothing happened on the first night. Determined to solve the mystery, we sat up the next night also. As we were about to give up, we heard his step. We let him pass our door and then followed him. Barrymore did exactly what he did before. And when we peeped into the room, he was crouched at the window, candle in hand and his face pressed against the window.

1. Who is the narrator?
2. Who is Barrymore?
3. What happened on the first night?
4. What happened on the second night?
5. What was Barrymore doing?

Answers:
1. The narrator is Dr Watson.
2. Mr Barrymore is son of the old caretaker and the butler of Baskerville Hall.
3. Sir Henry and Dr Watson stayed up, but nothing happened on the first night.
4. The second night, they saw Barrymore going into the last room of the corridor.
5. Barrymore was crouching at the window, holding the candle to the glass.

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