December 1, 2014

10th Biology New Syllabus - Experiment Questions on Photosynthesis

When an experiment is given as a question, draw the diagram first and
then label it. Then, write the format of the experiment. Explain your
observations and the inference you obtained at the end. When an
experiment is given as a question, other logical questions will also
be given. You should draw the diagram, write the experiment, and then
answer the additional questions too.For example..

Q. How do you prove that carbon dioxide is necessary for photosynthesis.
a. Why is this experiment called Mohl's half leaf experiment?
b. How do you de-starch a plant?
A: De starching a plant: to de-starch a plant, we need to keep the
plant in dark for about a week.

Aim: To prove that Carbon dioxide is necessary for Photosynthesis

Apparatus required wide mouthed transparent bottle, destarched plant,
potassium hydroxide pellets / potassium hydroxide solution, split
cork.
Procedure: Arrange the apparatus as shown in the figure. Take the wide
mouthed transparent bottle. Put potassium hydroxide pellets /
potassium hydroxide solution
in the bottle. (Potassium hydroxide absorbs carbon dioxide) ★ Insert
split cork in the mouth of the bottle.

Insert one of the leaves of de starched plant (through a split cork)
into transparent bottle containing potassium hydroxide dioxide
pellets/potassium hydroxide
solution. Leave the plant in sunlight. After a few hours, test this
leaf and any other leaf of this plant for starch.

Observation: The leaf that was exposed to the atmospheric air becomes
bluish black, and the one inside the flask containing potassium
hydroxide that absorbs carbon dioxide in the bottle does not become
blue-black.

Inference: This shows that carbon dioxide is necessary for photosynthesis.
a. Name of the experiment is taken from its inventor name. It is
called as Moll's half leaf experiment because Moll has divided the
leaf into two half portions one inside the bottle and other outside.
b. To de-starch a plant, we should keep the plant in dark for about a week.

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